Daily Dicamba Update: Bob Wolf on Boom Height

Editor’s Note: CropLife recently spoke with Bob Wolf, veteran application expert and president of Wolf Consulting & Research, on the revised dicamba label. Part two of the conversation is here.

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Daily Dicamba Update: Bob Wolf on Boom Height

Bob Wolf, Professor Emeritus at Kansas State University and president of Wolf Consulting & Research.

CropLife: According to the new requirements, the boom cannot exceed 24 inches above the target. We have heard this is going to be very tough for many applicators – some have said that in practical terms, it’s not happening.

Bob Wolf: It had better happen. In some of our fields where there’s contours and slopes, that’s a tough one. The question I get often on the phone is, ‘How can I keep my boom level it’s 100 feet wide and my ground has terraces and side slopes?’ The only advice I’ve ever been able to give somebody is, you just have to drive slower. That’s not typically language people like to hear in the application business, because their goal is to get more acres covered and make more money for the company if it’s a co-op or a commercial ag retailer. Or if it’s a farmer, he wants to get his weeds sprayed.

If they don’t stick to the label, we won’t have this product anymore. The EPA has given us a second year at it, and if it’s found that off-label applications are as problematic as we were told last year, that won’t be good.

Read more on the label requirements:

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Avatar for Sam Atwell Sam Atwell says:

Why are we not showing and teaching Hooded-Skirted Sprayers with low vacuums to capture fines for all pesticide applications?

Avatar for Sam Atwell Sam Atwell says:

It’s the nozzles that need to be 24 inches above the crop not the boom. We need to teach how to set nozzles on flexible non-rigid drops under hoods or skirts so the boom can ride higher with no air movement below.

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