USDA’s Farm Bill Priorities Unveiled At Commodity Classic

For the third consecutive year, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack addressed attendees of Commodity Classic’s General Session on Friday.

The topic this year focused on strengthening agriculture and rural economies.

Beginning his address by thanking the farmers in attendance, Vilsack acknowledged the huge contribution agriculture makes to the nation by providing an abundant, affordable food supply. Transitioning into his broader remarks, Vilsack shared the story of his recent interaction with a farmer and disabled veteran of the Iraq war noting the inspirational passion for agriculture that this Delaware pepper grower shared.

“The first and most important thing that we can do this year is to pass a farm bill and pass it now,” said Vilsack. “This job of writing and passing an equitable farm bill is not an easy task, but waiting for 2013 is not going to be any easier. It is incumbent both upon myself and upon you that we send a clear message to our representatives that we must do this now. “

Vilsack then addressed the principles which must be included in this legislation. First, he stressed the importance of ensuring farmers have a strong safety net through the crop insurance system. Noting that crop insurance now only protects to a point, he said that it would be necessary for Congress to bridge the current gaps to provide assistance to those who need it in real time so that they are able to maintain the farm through a crisis.

He then noted that the farm bill must incorporate a commitment to markets by maintaining our export programs. Last year, he explained that the United States exported nearly $137 billion worth of agricultural goods. He advocated for the confrontation of trade barriers and maintenance of key relationships with overseas partners.

Vilsack spoke to other important markets for agricultural production emphasizing the incredible potential of the bio-based economy for rural areas, to the importance of stable, well-designed conservation programs and to the need for investment in continued research.

Transitioning from farm bill issues, he acknowledged the importance of credit and tax policy to farmers. Vilsack called for Congress to remove the barriers to farming including land transfer and start-up capital that will help usher in the next generation in agriculture.

Finally, the Secretary spoke to the incredible role that biofuels play in improving our energy and national security. Pointing to improvements made over the past three years that have reduced U.S. oil imports to their lowest level in many years, Vilsack directly, emphatically spoke to his support of the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. He noted that White House calls for the increased usage of biofuels would decrease imports of foreign oil by a full 18 percent, the exact amount which is currently imported from Middle Eastern countries. Vilsack called for support of the industry that could reduce energy dependence on volatile regions. Calling upon attendees not only to show their support but to help spread the understanding that biofuels currently reduce prices at the pump by one dollar per gallon, he again thanked rural America for its contribution.

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One comment on “USDA’s Farm Bill Priorities Unveiled At Commodity Classic

  1. Ed Grimes

    There should also be noted the serious concern that using biofuel reduces food supply by deferring it to fuel, adding to the food supply dilemma. Second, holding petroleum out for the bio fuel mix, in essence adds to the shortage of petroleum which could be used for gasoline. The E fuels concept does not take this into consideration, nor the fact that it takes more energy to produce them than it saves. Miles per gallon are significantly lower in E fuels and, in may cases are not less expensive at the pump. Considering these questions, wouldn't farmers be better off concentrating on food production and leave the fuel supply to another source? No doubt the revenue opportunity exists for growers, but is it a viable solution? If so, how do we overcome those alternative costs mentioned here before?