CPS: A Marston Odyssey

Driving south down Interstate 55 in Missouri, observers are likely to notice a curious sight. Throughout this part of the state are thousands of bent or broken trees, victims of a severe ice storm that hit the area during 2009, leaving local residents with plenty of clean-up and repair work still being conducted more than one year later.

Yet, despite this damage from Mother Nature, the county has its share of blessings from Mother Earth. Thanks in part to nutrients from the nearby Mississippi River and naturally-rich soil, agriculture thrives in this part of the Midwest. Among the wounded trees are endless fields of all kinds of crops — corn, soybeans, cotton, wheat, and rice. According to area natives, some of this land has been farmed by local families for generations — and will likely be for generations to come.

 

To keep the growers in this agricultural community supplied with their crop input and custom application needs, ag retail giant Crop Production Services (CPS) has established what it calls the Mid-South Division. Consisting of more than 15 locations, the Mid-South Division has a lengthy service area following the course of the Mississippi, stretching from Cape Girardeau, MO, in the north to Dumas, AR, in the south.

Overseeing this group is Steve Martin, general manager. With the company for more than 10 years, Martin calls himself a “hometown boy,” growing up in the region and working in agriculture his whole life. In fact, his first job in 1980 was with fertilizer supplier Terra Industries, where he spent 20 years learning the trade. This employment background makes him intimately familiar with the wants and needs of CPS’ numerous grower-customers in the area, particularly when it comes to crop nutrients.

“Our growers are a hard-working group and expect that same level of commitment from their business partners,” says Martin. “If we promise to deliver them a load of potash or DAP (diammonium phosphate) at a certain time on a certain date, then we better be able to come through for them.”

Third-Party Complications

Unfortunately for CPS’ Mid-South Division, delivering on this promise has been sometimes difficult. As with many ag retailers in this part of the country, CPS works with third-party supply terminals in the region to source its fertilizer. For the most part, says Martin, this works out pretty well. However, on occasion, this arrangement has proven challenging for CPS, particularly during the busiest time of the year for the company — early spring.

“The problem we were running into was that the third-party terminals were on a different work schedule than we were,” he says. “While our growers are in their fields working, our locations stay open. It doesn’t matter if its seven days a week; whatever it takes to get fertilizer to our customers is what we will do. But we were having trouble doing this and staying ahead of the sometimes short application season because many third-party terminals didn’t want to stay open seven days a week. Most of them wanted to close at 5 p.m. on Friday and not re-open until the following Monday.”

Another issue with the third-party suppliers, says Martin, has been caused by nature occurrences in any river-based community — namely, water levels. “In the spring, the Mississippi sometimes rises too much for river terminals to operate,” he says. “At other times, the water is too low. In both cases, these high/low water events would cause our third-party terminals to close, which meant we sometimes couldn’t get the fertilizer we needed to supply our grower-customers.”

After enduring this set of circumstances for a couple of years, Martin had had enough. In his mind, he began to kick around the thought of CPS taking matters into its own hands by building its own fertilizer terminal on the Mississippi River to supply the northern portion of the Mid-South Division. “At first, building our own facility was just a pipe dream of ours,” he says. “But ultimately, I was the one catching all the crap when our outlets couldn’t deliver fertilizer to their customers on time, so I thought ‘why not?’”

Looking at the bigger picture, Martin believed such a move made financial sense as well for CPS. “On paper, the northern part of our division was moving approximately 125,000 tons of fertilizer per year,” he says. “This meant that any facility we put up could be used to supply just our CPS locations. We didn’t have to wholesale fertilizer outside our group to make the plant work.

“But it was really more of a defensive move on our part rather than an offensive one,” he continues. “I was constantly hearing griping from folks because our retail plants couldn’t get fertilizer on time, especially with the application season getting more compressed each year. Also, we needed to find a way to get product to our retail locations while not at the mercy of the river stages.”

When fertilizer sales for the marketplace went through the roof during the boom times of 2007, Martin decided it was time to act on his pipe dream. He approached CPS’ senior management with the company’s plan. Looking at the numbers and supply chain benefits, the management agreed that the time was right for the northern portion of the Mid-South Division to have its own fertilizer terminal on the river. It approved the project, providing the effort not cost more than $15 million to complete.

Enter Stueve

With approval and budget in hand, Martin set about finding a construction partner that could fulfill CPS’ requirements for the new facility. Without hesitation, he hired Stueve Construction Co., Algona, IA. “I’d worked with Stueve before, with the company having built nine plants during my career,” he says. “They always were exceptional in their eye for details and great about getting everything finished on time, so I had no trouble with working with them for this important project.”

Throughout 2008, Martin worked closely with Stueve personnel Jack Burns, president, Russ Buscher, director of engineering, Dr. Reynold Franklin, design engineer, and Dan Burns, CEO, to flesh out the facility specs. Remarkably, say all the players involved, this process went very smoothly, with the initial ground-breaking taking place on Feb. 1, 2009 as planned. Jack Burns credits Martin’s vision and pre-planning for keeping things on time.

“With many of the projects I’ve worked on in the past, you end up with scope creep, with the construction specifications being changed throughout the process because of the owner’s wants or vendors supplies,” he says. “But when you clearly define the scopes at the beginning of the project and not make changes, things flow very easily towards completion. The CPS project was like this — well thought out in advance so we had no surprises pop up to slow us down.”

One of the most important decisions regarding the new facility involved its location. According to Martin, he wanted a spot on the river where fertilizer barges could quickly unload their cargos and geographically be at the heart of the distribution range of the northern part of the Mid-South Division (approximately 75 miles in radius). He also wanted extra space around the terminal to expand in the future if necessary. Following some careful consideration, Martin ultimately chose nearby Marston, MO, for the facility.

“Not only is Marston just north of my office in Portageville, MO, but it has the added benefit of being the only harbor site between St. Louis and Memphis that has never been shut down due to high or low water levels,” he says. “That meant we would never have to worry about moving fertilizer from this location to our retail outlets.”

Once the site was picked, Martin entrusted Stueve with not only doing the main construction on the facility, but with hiring all the sub-contractors as well. “It made things so much easier for me to just have to make one call to Russ or Jack if I had any questions,” he says. “They would find out from the other partners and call me right back.”

With all the pre-planning and lack of scope creep, the Marston facility was completed on time and open for operation by November 2009 — only nine months after the initial ground-breaking. “Better yet, the total cost of the terminal came in under budget,” adds Martin.

A Mega Operation

Seen from an aerial image, the Mars­ton facility is massive, covering thousands of square feet on the banks of the Mississippi River. The facility features liquid fertilizer tanks supplied by A&B Welding, a huge dry fertilizer storage building dominated by two Waconia Manufacturing-supplied blend towers, and a liquid fertilizer loading shed. There’s even a maintenance shop, where CPS services a fleet of 10 hopper bottom trailers and five transport tankers.

In liquid fertilizer, the Marston facility is equipped to store 18,000 tons of product. This is delivered to truck drivers through a nearby two-bay shed, which is controlled through an automated system supplied by Kahler Automation, Fairmont, MN.

“To get a load, all a driver needs to do is pull up to the keypad and punch in his driver code,” says Martin. “The shed will then open up and the liquid fertilizer can be dispensed.” Once the product is loaded, the system will automatically send an e-mail confirming the order and letting customers know their liquid fertilizer in on the way.

“There’s even a safety feature in this system that won’t put more than 80,000 pounds into any tanker,” adds Martin. “This prevents any driver from leaving our facility with an overloaded truck.”

Of course, the heart of the complex is the dry fertilizer storage/loading building. This structure can hold up to 51,000 tons of crop nutrients at a time, making it the largest fertilizer terminal in the Midwest. Inside, holding bays are filled floor to ceiling with urea, DAP, potash, and the like.

Despite this size, however, the entire building can be run by as few as two employees, using John Deere front-end loaders and a sophisticated automated control system from Kahler. “We have two 14-ton blenders in one tower for blended products while the second tower consists of a holding bin for straight products,” says Martin. “In terms of speed, our operators can deliver a 24-ton load of straight fertilizer in five minutes or the same size load of blended product in eight minutes.” The terminal can even distribute other crop nutrients such as micronutrients or stabilizing products.

Besides its size and speed, the other impressive thing about the Marston facility is its design. For those unfamiliar with Midwestern geography, Marston is situated within the New Madrid Seismic Zone. In 1811-12, this region experienced what many scientists consider to be the strongest earthquake in U.S. history, measuring more than 8.0 on the moment magnitude scale. The quake destroyed the town of New Madrid, MO, changed the course of the Mississippi River, and was felt as far away as New York City and Boston, where church bells reportedly rang as the ground shook in Missouri.

Today, almost 200 years later, the area is still prone to minor tremors. “We typically get ground-shaking about four or five times per year, with most not registering more than 1.0 to 1.5 on the magnitude scale,” says Martin. “But because scientists predict another big one could occur at any time, we have to be prepared for it.”

This meant building the Marston facility with various earthquake-resistent safety measures. This includes having anchoring systems on the Waconia blend towers and the terminal’s 500,000-gallon ammonium thio-sulfate storage tank. In the dry fertilizer storage building, all of the walls are rodless and self-sustaining. According to Stueve’s Buscher, this will not only allow the structure to better weather a severe ground-shaking, but allows for more product to be kept within the bays because of its inherent lateral strength.

“Since the Marston plant is sitting on a fault line, it’s very beefed up for earthquake prevention,” he says. “In fact, we’ve built facilities in California that aren’t as beefed up as Marston is to withstand seismic activity.”

Future Plans

Within the next five years, Martin expects the northern part of CPS’ Mid-South Division to be delivering approximately 200,000 tons of fertilizer to grower-customers per year. With this added volume, he expects the Marston facility to pay for itself in as little as seven years.

“Once that happens, I would like to look at the possibility of building another fertilizer terminal to supply the southern half of the Mid-South Division,” he says. “But for now, I’m just happy knowing our retail outlets in the northern end will be covered when it comes to getting their fertilizer out on time.”

Topics:

Leave a Reply

CropLife 100 Stories

CropLife 100CHS To Build $3 Billion Fertilizer Plant In North Dakota
September 5, 2014
The fertilizer plant in Spiritwood will be the single largest investment in CHS history, as well as the single largest private investment project ever undertaken in North Dakota. Read More
CropLife 100BRANDT Acquires Lemon Ag Services
August 4, 2014
The acquisition of Lemon Ag fits BRANDT’s aggressive corporate strategy of providing superior agronomic advice and services for customers in central Illinois. Read More
CropLife 100Wilbur-Ellis To Relocate Agribusiness Division To Denver
July 16, 2014
The move Eastward will allow Wilbur-Ellis’ Agribusiness Division to be more accessible to relevant geographies and is expected to enhance communication and collaboration among the division’s nearly 3,000 employees. Read More
CropLife 100Map: Pinnacle Agriculture Holdings Acquisitions In 2014
May 29, 2014
Pinnacle Agriculture Holdings continues to expand its agricultural retail distribution business through these key acquisitions in 2014. Read More

Trending Articles

HerbicidesAdjusting To The New Reality Of Weed Control
November 4, 2014
Even with new cropping systems being readied for market introductions, weed control will remain a challenge for many. Read More
StewardshipResponsibleAg Begins Auditor Training
October 31, 2014
ResponsibleAg auditor training is now underway at the Ford B. West Center for Responsible Agriculture in Owensboro, KY. Read More
InsecticidesNew Research Study Shows The Value Of Neonics
October 29, 2014
The study evaluated seed treatment, soil and foliar uses of neonicotinoid insecticides in the U.S. and Canada. Read More
Crop InputsPlatform Specialty Products To Acquire Arysta LifeScience
October 20, 2014
Once the acquisition is complete, Platform Specialty Products will combine Arysta LifeScience with previously acquired companies Agriphar and Chemtura Crop Solutions. Read More
Seed/BiotechMonsanto Offers New Support For Ferguson, Area Communities
October 8, 2014
Monsanto Co. has committed $1 million in new support for several collaborative efforts in Ferguson, MO, and surrounding communities in North St. Louis County. Read More
Seed/BiotechUnapproved Genetically Modified Wheat Found In Montana
October 3, 2014
USDA reports that one year after discovery of Monsanto's unapproved wheat in a single Oregon field disrupted U.S. wheat export sales, the GMO wheat has again been found in Montana. Read More

Latest News

soybean field
Crop InputsABM Patents Microbial R&D Technique
November 25, 2014
Focused Microbial Diversity (FMD) is a newly patented technique employed by Advanced Biological Marketing (ABM) to research and develop microbials that will be used in ABM products Read More
Crop InputsStorage Options Help Grain Growers Go To Market
November 24, 2014
While on-farm storage in a traditional upright storage bin is one possibility for storing grain, it may not be for everyone. Read More
Eric SfiligojGiving Thanks For Another Great Year
November 24, 2014
As Thanksgiving Day 2014 arrives, agriculture has plenty to be thankful for. Read More
Crop InputsSyngenta Cost-Cutting Program To Affect 1,800 Jobs
November 24, 2014
The company's Accelerating Operational Leverage program will result in job reductions and relocations totaling around 1,800 across the company, the majority of which will occur in 2015. Read More
EquipmentAGCO Announces Operator Of The Year Finalists
November 20, 2014
Four custom applicators have been selected by AGCO Application Equipment as finalists for 2014 Operator of the Year, an honor that recognizes them as being among the top professionals in their industry throughout North America. Read More
MicronutrientsH.J. Baker Expands Tiger-Sul Business
November 20, 2014
H.J. Baker has created and filled two strategic positions in business development and sales within its Crop Performance Division. Read More
soybean field
FertilizerGeneral Mills Honors United Suppliers For Nitrogen Opti…
November 19, 2014
United Suppliers winning proposal detailed SUSTAIN, a consulting network that provides customized products and services for farmers using a needs-based system approach. Read More
EmployeesOhio AgriBusiness Association Awards $25,000 In Scholar…
November 19, 2014
Each year, the Ohio AgriBusiness Association Educational Trust scholarship program awards scholarship dollars to students enrolled in an agriculture-related field attending several state colleges. Read More
ManagementServi-Tech Names New CEO
November 17, 2014
Servi-Tech has named Greg Ruehle its new president and CEO. Read More
CropLife 100Pinnacle Ag Acquires Colorado Aerial Application Outlet
November 17, 2014
Ft. Lupton, CO-based Reck Aviation — a full-service chemical application company providing aerial crop applications of fertilizers and crop protection products — will operate as part of Pinnacle's AgOne Application Services brand. Read More
Eric SfiligojMcDonald’s Message: Biotech Crops Scarier Than Cancer
November 17, 2014
Despite their potential health benefits, one of the world’s largest potato users will pass on a new biotech offering. Read More
MicronutrientsWinField Releases 2014 NutriSolutions Results
November 14, 2014
A number of significant regional and national crop deficiency trends emerged from the 2014 WinField NutriSolutions tissue sampling program. Read More
FertilizerH.J. Baker Opens Chinese Production Lines
November 14, 2014
The occasion was the official launch of the Tiger-Sul sulphur Bentonite production line of two much anticipated fertilizer products in China, T90CR sulphur fertilizer and TZinc micronutrient enhanced sulphur fertilizer. Read More
ManagementOhio Certified Crop Adviser Program Accepting Nominatio…
November 14, 2014
The award recognizes an individual who delivers exceptional customer service for farmer clients in nutrient management, soil and water management, integrated pest management and crop production in Ohio. Read More
HerbicidesSyngenta Announces Acuron Trial Plot Results
November 14, 2014
Acuron was tested at 167 trial locations across 35 states. Trials included 95 Syngenta locations, 54 university locations and 18 distributor locations. Read More
Crop InputsVerdesian Expands Sales Force
November 13, 2014
The new sales representatives will work with growers, retail partners and distributors to oversee technical training and product education. Read More
EquipmentAGCO Raises $100K For Wounded Warrior Project
November 13, 2014
AGCO Corp. partnered with local AGCO dealers across the U.S. and Canada to raise nearly $100,000 in support of wounded service veterans. Read More
HerbicidesDow AgroSciences Announces Launch Of Enlist Duo Herbici…
November 12, 2014
It will be launched in conjunction with a stewarded introduction of Enlist corn, and seed production of Enlist soybeans in 2015. Read More