CDL Renewals Due In Some States

Drivers: Depending on the state in which you hold a hazardous materials endorsement (HME) on a state-issued commercial drivers license (CDL), it may be time to renew.

The Transportation Safety Administration’s (TSA) Hazardous Materials Endorsement Threat Assessment Program conducts a security threat assessment for any driver seeking to obtain, renew, or transfer a HME on a CDL.

The program began January 2005 as part of the USA PATRIOT Act, and it prohibits states from issuing a license to transport HAZMAT unless a determination has been made that the driver does not pose a security risk. The TSA security threat assessment is valid for up to five years, but CDLs and HMEs are renewed based on a cycle determined by the state. Thus, in the states that have chosen to require a renewal cycle of every four years, like Illinois and Minnesota, it is time to renew.

If you seek to obtain, renew, or transfer an HME on your CDL, you must apply for a security threat assessment. TSA rules require you to begin applying for the security threat assessment at least 30 days prior to the expiration of your CDL. Click here for more information.

(Source: The Agricultural Retailers Association)

Leave a Reply

One comment on “CDL Renewals Due In Some States

  1. Anonymous

    While I recognize the value to national security for background checks of those that need to have a Hazmat endorsement, some to make a living, I feel it puts a number of agricultural workers (many part-time) at a serious economic disadvantage. If nation security is such a major issue (and should be), then the general population (which is the benefactor of such oversight) should stand the cost of these background checks. Why don’t we, as a nation, require fingerprint backgound checks of ALL in this country that desire to possess any driver’s license? Because the general population would never stand for the cost that is passed along to each individual. However, for those that need this endorsement, because of their relative small numbers in relation to the overall US population, have no capability of opposing it. All or none should share the cost, United States, not just a small demographic. If it benefits all, then all should share the cost. If that is not a reasonable solution, then EVERY person who operates a motor vehicle in this country should be subject to the same regulatory oversight. Why is the possessor of a CDL the only target? Those who operate passenger cars and pickup trucks can be just as much of a concern.