Case IH Rides A Cleaner Engine

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Last week, I was a guest at a media event hosted by Case IH at its headquarters in Racine, WI. The company offered all of us in attendance a glimpse of many of its newest equipment innovations, including a new and improved 30 Series Titan floater and AFS wireless features.

Yet, for me, perhaps the most interesting news from the meeting was how Case IH is expanding its cleaner engine technology with the patented Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) engine. Manufactured by sister company Fiat Powertrain Technologies (FPT), SCR engines are designed to significantly reduce emissions as mandated by the EPA. At present, more than 13,000 SCR engines are in the North American marketplace, having logged more than three million field hours since 2010, according to the company.

“We have to comply with the new emissions standards, but we also want to deliver long-term value to our customers, and SCR-only engines have allowed us to do that,” said David Stark, Case IH North America sales and product trainer. “These types of changes can make a real, positive economic impact over time.”

SCR is an engine exhaust aftertreatment that works outside the engine rather than the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems or hybrid systems that combine both EGR and SCR, which can sometimes impact engine design and performance. When it comes to horsepower, Case IH engines feature some of the highest levels of power per cubic liter while maintaining industry-leading fuel efficiency, Clark said.

“When the emissions components from the engine are removed, the engine can breathe and produce high levels of horsepower,” he said. “There are no emissions components on the engines, which is one reason for the high horsepower levels.”

Providing for cleaner air and increasing customer efficiency is a nice tandem for Case IH and its SCR engines and represents a great story to tell everyone. It’s one that can be shared across the board, from those that make a living in the agricultural world to those who just enjoy breathing cleaner air.

Sfiligoj is the Editor for both CropLife and CropLife IRON magazines. He travels regularly to cover industry events and has been dedicated to the ag retail industry since he joined the staff in 2000.

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