Ag Commissioner Approves Aerial Application Of Corn Herbicide

North Dakota agriculture commissioner Doug Goehring has issued a special local needs (SLN) registration to Bayer CropScience allowing aerial application of Laudis Herbicide for better control of kochia and ALS-resistant kochia in cornfields.

“Ground pesticide application equipment cannot get into fields because of wet conditions,” Goehring said. “Since available alternatives are only effective on very small kochia plants, corn growers wanted permission to make aerial applications of Laudis to better manage kochia and to give them an additional mode of action to manage herbicide resistance.”

Goehring emphasized that the registration is a temporary measure.

“This is a short-term solution,” he said.” Therefore the registration expires Aug. 15, 2011.”

The SLN labeling allows Laudis to be aerially applied to corn at a rate of 3 fluid ounces per acre, the same use rate allowed for ground application. Applications can be made from emergence up to the V8 state of growth for field corn or popcorn, or from emergence up to the V7 growth stage of sweet corn. The labeling only allows one application to sweet corn. Two applications, totaling up to 6 ounces of product and at least seven days apart, may be made to field corn or popcorn. Grazing livestock or harvesting corn forage within 45 days of application is prohibited. Applications are allowed only when the wind speed is less than 10 mph. Additional restrictions can be found in the SLN supplemental labeling.

“Corn acreage in Ransom and Richland counties overlaps the habitat of the Western prairie fringed orchid,” Goehring said. “The SLN labeling contains specific restrictions for reducing exposure to this threatened species.”

Rich Zollinger, North Dakota State University extension weed scientist, said the SLN registration will help producers better manage weeds in a difficult growing season.

“With wet conditions across the entire state, we need every viable option for weed management,” Zollinger said. “Laudis applied through aerial application will control many important weeds in corn.”

Kochia (Kochia scoparia) is one of the most serious weeds affecting North Dakota producers. It is highly adaptable and can produce a large number of seeds. Left uncontrolled, kochia can significantly impact yield of corn and other crops.

Corn is an increasingly important crop in North Dakota. The state ranked 13th in production of corn for grain in the U.S.

Leave a Reply