9 Basic Components Of A Nutrient Management Plan

9 Basic Components Of A Nutrient Management Plan

A nutrient management plan will help you manage commercial fertilizer and animal manure input costs. It will also help you do your part to improve your state’s surface water quality. A nutrient management plan for nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) should consider all potential sources of nutrients including, but not limited to:

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  • N contributions from legumes and crop rotations;
  • Animal manure and organic by-products;
  • Waste water;
  • Commercial fertilizer;
  • Soil nutrient availability; and
  • Irrigation water.

The following components should be included in a nutrient management plan:

1. An aerial photograph or map, and a soil map of the field.

2. A current and/or planned crop production sequence or crop rotation.

3. Results of soil, plant, water, manure or organic by-product sample analysis.

4. Realistic yield potentials for crops in the rotation.

5. A quantification (listing) of all nutrient sources.

6. Recommended nutrient rates, timing, form and method of application including incorporation timing for the time period of the plan.

7. Location of designated sensitive areas or resources and the associated nutrient management restriction.

8. Guidance for implementation, operation, maintenance, recordkeeping, and complete field-by-field nutrient budget for nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium for the rotation or crop sequence.

9. A statement that the plan was developed based on current standards and any applicable Federal, state, or local regulations or policies; that changes in any of these requirements may necessitate a revision of the plan.

Source: “Nutrient Management Plan,” Iowa State University, University Extension

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After reading this article I obtain a copy of Iowa State Extension Nutrient Management Plan. The Plan listed 6 potential sources of nutrients. First on the list was N contributions from legumes and crop rotation. I assume this included the rhizobacteria nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that aggressively colonize plant roots. The energy required to feed these bacteria comes from the plant.Plants have to extrude 20 to 40 % of the energy they generate via photosysthis to the plant roots. This is a heavy tax on plants. They failed to list the source of FREE nitrigen taken from the air by non-symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria such as Rhodospirillum. These bacteria generate their own energy and do not Tax the plant. The bacteria inhabit the entire cicurlatory of the plant producing ATP and glocose 24 hours per day. in a recent study by Rutgers Univ. using biological product Quantum Growth on green peppers showed a 23.55% increase in yield and a 23% reduction in fertilzer usage. The Return on Investment was 29.88 times.